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NEWSLETTER - SUMMER
June 24, 2019 

Water Quality Questions

I. President’s Corner

Announcing the Beaches Water Cooperative's Annual Meeting
Date: September 8, 2019
Time: 3:00 pm
Location: Long Beach Civic Center (5845 Calvert Blvd)

The Beaches Water Cooperative has had some difficulties this year, characterized by a few failures of our infrastructure, a reminder of the age of much of our system. In the last few months we had a 20,000-gallon pneumatic tank at the (main) Slater Plant fail, which required it being taken out of service. No small thing, in that the Slater Plant is the main driver of the system for much of the beach, with its 100,000-gallon storage tank. Dennis DiBello was able to reconfigure the piping and controls to keep the plant operating temporarily. The tank and supporting equipment are essential to the system operation, particularly as summer approaches and demand for water increases. The costs for replacing the tank and reconfiguring to accommodate necessary piping, pouring concrete cradles for the new tank, plus changes and control work once it is reset, will exceed $75,000, since that is essentially the cost of only the tank and transport. Dennis and his crew do everything they can to improve and ensure the future longevity of each repair, but many needed repairs, such as galvanized pipe which leaks after it has been in the ground for 80 years in some cases, cannot be predicted. When the system was privately owned, it had no upgrades to speak of, and repairs only as needed, since the system was under the Public Service Commission, and the owner was unable to raise rates until the repairs were completed. That required huge outlays of money to bring the system up to par, so the owner expressed an interest in selling. We found over the years, that banks do not want a water system, so a group of community members became the founders of BWC. They worked tirelessly to structure buying the system, incorporating it, then worked for months to find funding. They were finally able to obtain a "Farmers Home Loan" to get started. From that difficult start, we have been able to make vast improvements over the years, and that continues.

Our structure for the last 22 years has been that we have a Licensed Water System Operator, and System Manager, both incorporated in Dennis DiBello. Dennis was the guiding force behind our organization which resulted in an award for our cooperative from USDA as a model for cooperatives. Dennis seems to grow older every year and will eventually be ready to retire, though fortunately not in the immediate future. I do not think it is hyperbole to say that the system in its current form would not exist without Dennis, but that presents challenges. It is difficult to find people with the skill set to take over. We have predicated our budget this year on working to hire and train a Water System Operator who can gradually take over the operation of the system to carry it into the future. We have funded and completed a GIS (Geographic Information System) study to allow mapping the entire system, the pumping stations, the piping, the valves, the connections, pressure control valves, fire hydrants, vaults, and meters, with locations as exact as we can make them, again, an excellent move initiated by Dennis.

The GIS information is being incorporated in a binder, and the GPS locations of the equipment are recorded as well, along with background information that will allow repairs to be pinpointed and accomplished without unnecessary delays. The knowledge that we now possess must be recorded carefully to facilitate an eventual smooth transition to the next phase of the operation of our Cooperative. When a trainee is selected and hired, we will need to pay them and Dennis at the same time, until such time as the new Operator is able to work on their own.

We feel it is unnecessary to raise rates at this time, but when we hire a trainee, we may have to do so. "Please pay your bill on time". I would guess that we spend nearly as much collecting from the 20% of our members who do not pay on time as the original billing costs. It is a needless expense and more expensive for the members involved.

Please plan to attend our annual meeting on the second Sunday of September at 3:00 pm. Those attending or sending in a proxy vote will be eligible for a $100 credit toward their water bill.

Please note again that it is illegal for anyone not an employee of the cooperative, to open a meter pit or shut off water to a home. Some damage has been done in the past, sometimes by plumbers who should know better. If you need a shutoff, call the office at 410-586-8710.

Thank you!

Gary Clarke
President, Beaches Water Cooperative

II. Water System Operations, Maintenance & Improvements

The main communities of Calvert Beach and Long Beach were originally incorporated in 1929 as beach communities. As many of you know over the years the communities have progressed from being weekend cottages to full-time houses. Also, the communities have expanded to include new subdivisions. In the same sense of time, some of the in-ground pipes of the water system are over seventy years old whereas some of the pipes are newer. The tank that Mr. Clarke spoke of above was 31 years old when it failed. It was the main and largest pneumatic tank in the system until a few years ago when we installed two more 20,000 gallon tanks to ensure system reliability. This year we also had a well pump fail at the same pump house that was of the same vintage. There comes a time when we have to renew our equipment and strategic planning for that renewal is important.

The last year has not only been a very pivotal year for operation of the water system, but also for personnel. Not only has the system gotten older, our team has been at this for over 23 years. As with the aging of the water system we all have gotten older. This past fiscal year, three of our senior staff have retired: Jackie Jacob, Kenny Grover, and Bob Gross. Each, in their own way, has been a great asset for the water company. Many of the administrative and financial systems we have in place for the water company today are a result of Jackie's efforts. Kenny came to us from the plumber who used to run the system in 1996 and he had a world of knowledge about the system which we captured in the GIS mapping. Bob was ever reliable on any day the week, any type of weather, in any type of situation to get the job done. I thank them all for their time and service and wish them well in the future. Of course they have not entirely left as they come back periodically to help keep us straight as the new team moves forward. The Beaches Water Company survives throughout the changes and challenges. Our recognition as a co-op from USDA is detailed in a proclamation and award. The award was a miniature glass lighthouse which represents BWC as a beacon for others to follow.

If you have any questions about the Operation or Maintenance of the system please give us a call.

V/R,

Dennis DiBello, Business Manager and Superintendent

III. Financials & Water Rates

How your bill is calculated. For example if you used 3011 gallons:

0-1000 gallons $32.00
1001-2000 gallons $3.50/thousand gallons
2001-3000 gallons $5.00/thousand gallons
3001-4000 gallons $5.75/thousand gallons
4001-5000 gallons $6.50/thousand gallons
5001-10,000 gallons $7.00/thousand gallons
Over 10,000 gallons $7.50/thousand gallons
A monthly usage of 3011 gallons would result in a water bill of $40.56
Usage: 0-1000 + 1001-2000 + 2001-3000 + 3001-4000 (partial)
Fee: $32.00 + $3.50 + $5.00 + $0.06 = $40.56

Similar rate scales are used by the Calvert County water systems and the Chesapeake Ranch Estates Water Co-op. These rates are based on the projected budget for next year (approximately $459,894). Fortunately, the months included both low and high use months, so we have a good idea of the how much revenue the different schemes should produce.

The "Bay Restoration Fee", i.e. Flush Tax, of $15 per quarter will be apportioned as $5 monthly payments on the monthly water bill.

Fiscal year 7/1/19 - 6/30/20

BWC FY 2019/20 BUDGET INCOME
Water service 449,593
Office Rent 1,200
Advertising-Quarterly 1,500
Application & Transfer Fees 6,200
Cash Drawdown 44,566
Total Income 503,059
BWC FY 2019/20 BUDGET EXPENSES
Auditing 10,000
Bad Debt 1,030
Bank Service Charges 6,200
Depreciation Expense 91,691
Professional Memberships 800
Engineering 1,500
Insurance 12,000
Mortgage Pay Down 22,095
Mortgage Interest 7,478
Legal 5,000
Licenses and Permits 600
Office - Other 12,000
Operating Supplies 18,450
Repairs & Maintenance 23,575
Routine Service 256,396
Solid Waste Fee & BRF 50
Utilities 30,000
Water Testing 4,194
Total Expense 503,059

2018 Annual Water Quality & Consumer Confidence Report

Our drinking water is safe and meets all federal and state requirements for community drinking water. In 2018, there were no water quality violations.

BEACHES WATER CO-OPERATIVE
MD0040009

Annual Water Quality Report for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2018

This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the water system to provide safe drinking water.

The source of drinking water used by BEACHES WATER CO-OPERATIVE is Ground Water: Nanjemoy and Aquia confined aquifers.

For more information regarding this report contact:
Name: Dennis DiBello
Phone: 410-586-8710

Este informe contiene informaciˇn muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Trad˙zcalo ˇ hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Source of Drinking Water
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pickup substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.

Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Source Water Name   Type of Water Report Status Location
Gerard (bayfront/bayview) CA029966 CA029966 GW Y Long Beach approx. 200 ft W of Main St
Jorgensen 1 (locust 1) CA054043 CA054043 GW Y Long Beach approx. .5 mi e of Rt 2
Jorgensen 2 (locust 2) CA811941 CA811941 GW Y Near 1.3 mi se of St Leonard approx. 300 ft W of Beach Rd
Rausch (balsam) CA054331 CA054331 GW Y Long Beach approx. .5 mi e of Rt 2
Slater 1 (new well) CA920901 CA920901 GW Y Near 4 SE of St Leonard approx. 50 ft W of Long Beach Dr & Hill Rd
Slater 2 CA811940 CA811940 GW Y Near 1.3 mi SE of St Leonard approx. 200 ft w of Long Beach Rd
Slater 3 CA882256 CA882256 GW Y Near 5 mi SE of St Leonard approx. 50 ft S of Long Beach Rd

Lead and Copper

Definitions:
Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Lead and Copper Date Sampled MCLG Action Level (AL) 90th Percentile # Sites Over Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Copper 7/13/2016 1.3 1.3 0.32 0 ppm N Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems
Lead 7/13/2016 0 15 6.6 0 ppm N Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

Water Quality Test Results

Avg: Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.
Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
mrem: millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)
na: not applicable.
ppm: milligrams per liter or parts per million - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.
ppb: micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.
Treatment Technique or TT: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Chlorine 2018 0.9 0.8-0.9 MRDLG = 4 MRDL = 4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes.
Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) 2018 1 1.1-1.1 No goal for the total 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection
Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2018 5 4.55 - 4.55 No goal for the total 80 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection
 
Inorganic Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Arsenic - While your drinking water meets EPA standards for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPAs standard balances the current understanding of arsenics possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. 2018 9 4.9 - 12.2 0 10 ppb N Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.
Fluoride 2018 0.3 0.3 - 0.3 4 4.0 ppm N Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
Terminology used in this report is what is generally accepted as a means of measurement of the degree of contaminants in the water.
Contaminants include naturally occurring items in the water such as minerals and foreign matter that may or may not be acceptable based on the level detected.

Lead Statement: If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Beaches Water Co-op is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your drinking water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791).

  VISA and Mastercard:
We are now accepting VISA and Mastercard payments.   You may come by
 the office to make payment, pay over the phone, via www.beacheswater.com
 or include credit card billing information on your billing statement.
 

Ruler

Please submit all questions and comments to 
beacheswater5901@gmail.com